COPD BRONCHITIS AND EMPHYSEMA

What is COPD?

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that causes obstructed airflow from the lungs. Symptoms include breathing difficulty, cough, mucus (sputum) production and wheezing. It’s typically caused by long-term exposure to irritating gases or particulate matter, most often from cigarette smoke. People with COPD are at increased risk of developing heart disease, lung cancer and a variety of other conditions.

Emphysema and chronic bronchitis are the two most common conditions that contribute to COPD. These two conditions usually occur together and can vary in severity among individuals with COPD.

Chronic bronchitis is inflammation of the lining of the bronchial tubes, which carry air to and from the air sacs (alveoli) of the lungs. It’s characterized by daily cough and mucus (sputum) production.

Emphysema is a condition in which the alveoli at the end of the smallest air passages (bronchioles) of the lungs are destroyed as a result of damaging exposure to cigarette smoke and other irritating gases and particulate matter.

Although COPD is a progressive disease that gets worse over time, COPD is treatable. With proper management, most people with COPD can achieve good symptom control and quality of life, as well as reduced risk of other associated conditions.

SYMPTOMS OF COPD

COPD symptoms often don’t appear until significant lung damage has occurred, and they usually worsen over time, particularly if smoking exposure continues.

Signs and symptoms of COPD may include:

  • Shortness of breath, especially during physical activities
  • Wheezing
  • Chest tightness
  • A chronic cough that may produce mucus (sputum) that may be clear, white, yellow or greenish
  • Frequent respiratory infections
  • Lack of energy
  • Unintended weight loss (in later stages)
  • Swelling in ankles, feet or legs

People with COPD are also likely to experience episodes called exacerbations, during which their symptoms become worse than the usual day-to-day variation and persist for at least several days.

HOW THE SALT CAVE CAN HELP

During the Salt Therapy process the overwhelming majority of patients notice a decrease in cough frequency and intensity, and that it’s easier to cough up mucus, which becomes less sticky and changes in its nature. COPD sufferers find that not only does Salt Therapy bring immediate relief in the shorter, but also delays the frequency of reoccurrence.

Salt Therapy is a clinically proven natural, safe and beneficial method of treatment for every age group. By visiting one of our Salt Rooms and breathing in the saline aerosol generated by our machine it can significantly help to:

  • Reduce the need for inhalers, steroids and antibiotics
  • Make your breathing easier after just a few sessions
  • Improve lung function
  • Reduce the number of hospital admissions
  • Alleviate sneezing, coughing, and shortness of breath
  • Clear mucus and sticky phlegm from the lungs
  • Increase the resistance to respiratory tract diseases
  • Strengthen your immune system
  • Prolong remission times

HOW OFTEN SHOULD YOU COME?

  • Depending on age and stage of your condition, 20-30 sessions are recommended for long term results.
  • The sessions should be frequent; about two or three a week is suggested.
  • For irreversible conditions, two to three-month follow-up sessions are recommended to maintain the clear lungs.


In most patients, after a course of Salt Therapy, airways become normal and symptoms disappear. The treatment’s efficacy is estimated at 75-98%. Most clients do 1-2 Salt Therapy courses a year. In between they might come back for some top-up sessions, if they start to feel poorly, e.g. they are coming down with a cold.