Cystic Fibrosis

What is Cystic Fibrosis?

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disorder that causes severe damage to the lungs, digestive system and other organs in the body.

Cystic fibrosis affects the cells that produce mucus, sweat and digestive juices. These secreted fluids are normally thin and slippery. But in people with CF, a defective gene causes the secretions to become sticky and thick. Instead of acting as lubricants, the secretions plug up tubes, ducts and passageways, especially in the lungs and pancreas.

Although cystic fibrosis is progressive and requires daily care, people with CF are usually able to attend school and work. They often have a better quality of life than people with CF had in previous decades. Improvements in screening and treatments mean that people with CF now may live into their mid- to late 30s or 40s, and some are living into their 50s.

SYMPTOMS OF CYSTIC FIBROSIS

In the U.S., because of newborn screening, cystic fibrosis can be diagnosed within the first month of life, before symptoms develop. But people born before newborn screening became available may not be diagnosed until the signs and symptoms of CF show up.

Cystic fibrosis signs and symptoms vary, depending on the severity of the disease. Even in the same person, symptoms may worsen or improve as time passes. Some people may not experience symptoms until their teenage years or adulthood. People who are not diagnosed until adulthood usually have milder disease and are more likely to have atypical symptoms, such as recurring bouts of an inflamed pancreas (pancreatitis), infertility and recurring pneumonia.

People with cystic fibrosis have a higher than normal level of salt in their sweat. Parents often can taste the salt when they kiss their children. Most of the other signs and symptoms of CF affect the respiratory system and digestive system.

Respiratory signs and symptoms:

The thick and sticky mucus associated with cystic fibrosis clogs the tubes that carry air in and out of your lungs. This can cause signs and symptoms such as:

  • A persistent cough that produces thick mucus (sputum)
  • Wheezing
  • Exercise intolerance
  • Repeated lung infections
  • Inflamed nasal passages or a stuffy nose
  • Recurrent sinusitis

Digestive signs and symptoms:

The thick mucus can also block tubes that carry digestive enzymes from your pancreas to your small intestine. Without these digestive enzymes, your intestines aren’t able to completely absorb the nutrients in the food you eat. The result is often:

  • Foul-smelling, greasy stools
  • Poor weight gain and growth
  • Intestinal blockage, particularly in newborns (meconium ileus)


Chronic or severe constipation, which may include frequent straining while trying to pass stool, eventually causing part of the rectum to protrude outside the anus (rectal prolapse)

HOW THE SALT CAVE CAN HELP

If you or a family member suffers from cystic fibrosis, you should seriously consider Salt Therapy. Not only will it bring much-needed relief, but it also prevents your symptoms recurring so frequently.

Salt Therapy is a clinically proven natural, safe and beneficial method of treatment for every age group. By visiting one of our Salt Rooms and breathing in the saline aerosol generated by our machine it can significantly help to:

  • Reduce the need for inhalers and antibiotics
  • Make your breathing easier after just a few sessions
  • Improve lung function
  • Reduce the number of hospital admissions
  • Alleviate sneezing, coughing, and shortness of breath
  • Clear mucus and sticky phlegm from the lungs
  • Kill bacteria
  • Increase the resistance to respiratory tract diseases

HOW OFTEN SHOULD YOU COME?

  • Depending on age and stage of your condition, 20-30 sessions are recommended for long term results.
  • Then follow-up sessions every two to three months are recommended to maintain the clear lung, clearing out retained mucus from the humps.
  • The sessions should be frequent; about two or three a week is suggested.